“The Passion of Jeanne d’Arc” and Nick Cave

http://wwwthelastpictureshow.blogspot.com/2008/12/memento-joan-of-arc-and-nick-cave.html

THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC is certainly Dreyer’s finest hour, and Cave’s heartfelt tribute turned it into a truly extraordinary experience; quite simply the most emotional and physically draining experience I’ve witnessed at the cinema. Dreyer’s film is based on two novels by Joseph Delteil on the original transcript of this infamous trial. Delteil assisted Dreyer with the screenplay, but there’s little doubt that the court records set the tone for this harrowing film. THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC is composed almost entirely of close-ups, and the final stages of the trial – along with Joan’s execution – are dominated by the face of Renee (‘Marie’) Falconetti. The plight of the woman who claimed she was sent by God to save France is indelibly printed on Falconetti’s tortured visage; indeed her performance is so intense, it seems as though she was actually possessed by the spirit of this revered Saint. As Joan is tortured and humiliated by the ‘devil’s agents’ en route to her eventual confession, Falconetti cries what are so obviously real tears. This has to be a real contender for the most courageous performance ever given by an actress, and I was astonished to learn that this was her first and last film. Reports indicate she received help and advice from her director along every step of the way but, ultimately, Renee Falconetti must have felt more alone than any woman in silver screen history. Her overwhelming presence makes this a painful viewing experience, and Dreyer’s obsessive approach to his subject matter is still guaranteed to disturb, even in an age where we think we’ve seen everything. Falconetti’s inner strength, her unparalleled suffering and eventual despair manage to cross that often impenetrable barrier between screen and audience, forcing us to feel her pain and, occasionally recoil in horror. The scene where Joan is ‘bled’ so that she may live to deny her faith is extremely graphic, drawing gasps from an incredulous audience and when her execution takes place, the band stop playing and become as one with the packed auditorium who are stunned by this tragic history lesson.
Cave has gone on record as saying this is his all-time favourite film and it showed, Nick! Here, The Dirty Three offered mostly understated background support, with smoldering violin and guitar anchored down by Jim White’s steady beat. Occasionally, the boys really put their feet on the pedals, responding to Dreyer’s disturbing visuals with all the brutality of prime-time Bad Seeds. However, it was the quieter moments that really left a scar: Cave’s beautifully fragile piano, his wordless vocals which often mutate into a haunting ‘This is my desire’ refrain, and his unerring ability to correctly call when the music should stop. A prime example of this came near the end of the film, when Joan is burnt at the stake. As the flames rise, a deathly silence envelopes the NFT, as we watch the crowd who gathered to witness the execution suddenly realise the enormity of this obscene act and openly revolt. It’s then that Cave chooses to deliver his only song of the evening; a plaintive vocal which addresses “God’s non-intervention”.